The Pirate Show with Dave Lordan Standing Rock Special available now on Mixcloud

Edition 2 of the Pirate Show featuring Voices From Standing Rock, The Blackfoot Confederacy, Zona Marginal, Lillian Allen, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Benjamin Zephaniah, Olive Groove , King Mob, Andrea Gibson, Pyschic TV, David ‘the rabbi’ Lawrence, Thomas McCarthy, Christy Hennessy, Johnny Darko, The 5th Dimension, Jinx Lennon….Hip-Hop, pow-wow, Dub, Spoken Word, Acappella, Folk, Soul, Hybrid, Cult….broadcast on Dublin Digital Radio Sat Nov 5th at 4pm & Clonline Radio on Sat Nov 12th at 8pm. Show will also be uploaded to Dublin Digital Radio’s mixcloud.

The Freedom of Nothing, by Persons Unknown

I occupy, repair and maintain squatted buildings, and I often feel utterly fulfilled.

I find it difficult to express any general mindset of feeling free, as I feel all people express it for themselves in different ways; inevitably existing within some ‘system’ or another. I also find it difficult to express any general mindset of the larger community of friends that I have come to know through squatting as it, too, varies widely.

Personally speaking, so… I feel that I am free since I abandoned the notion of financing a suggested lifestyle via a career that (in my opinion) directly powers a resource-driven war-machine throughout the world. In other words, I stopped worrying about ever owning property, being employed and paying tax. The means and resources I need in order to live and enable myself, and also to participate voluntarily where I choose, are abundant. Here in my home I am surrounded by beautiful art, musical instruments, fine fabrics, an abundance of plants and a very loving community of friends. I have no morning alarm, but awaken excited and joyous every day. Living this way has changed my life in the most incredible ways, but those are not what I will talk about.

‘Squatable’ empty buildings are everywhere and access has in many cases already been made by adventurous local youths. It’s all about people; taking up residency, securing and utilizing space. The legal history of this subject has a long standing and solidified record, seemingly to be allowed exist as a kind of social pacifier in context of activism, or maybe an economic lubricant/tool in context of dereliction. Buildings can be made liveable with some resourcefulness. However, it must be mentioned at this point that it is (in my opinion) primarily the set of relationships that you have with people and communities that will be of most help.

People—all people—and relationships are paramount.

There are many involved people and communities besides squatters; like activists, artists, musicians and poets, food co-ops, work and bike co-ops, couriers, small local shops, building suppliers, contractors, and of course the neighbours that get to know each other through this sub-culture. Much can be generously gifted by people and businesses just with a conversation. A lot of stuff is actually a burden on many people and they are happy for us to take it away—a friend of mine has an expression: “We’ll take anything from bent nails up!” Many cafes, restaurants, supermarkets etc. throw out shocking amounts of packaged, perfectly fine and often very expensive food. If some repair work is needed it is not too difficult to find the parts and the advice or help with that. Much can be found in skips of houses undergoing renovations but more can be got through a conversation with the builder. Bikes are great, bike-trailers even better. Pretty much any old junk can be stripped, reinvented or ‘hacked’ into something new. Gardening is fun to learn, and nothing is waste, at least ideologically speaking.

Bottom line? Squatting is political. Occupying a space that may be hazardous or merit any feeling of insecurity (such as fear of attack or eviction for whatever reason) is a morally guided or necessity driven decision. You make your own policy outside of the civic arena for your own reasons. By removing state and corporate benefits from our labor we are ignoring elitist policy, and are often breaking some statute that we have presumably consented to and potentially face consequences for. Things like ‘busking-licences’ appear, which seem logical until one considers the growing wealth-gap, or perhaps the immense and largely untaxed foreign corporate profits. Many of my friends rely solely on busking to have any kind of income, and they make that little go a long way—usually in the form of something like new shoelaces or guitar-strings.

Many have stronger political views and I find most living this way have far more freedom and drive to act on and express those views and do so, in most cases with admirable impact. Numerous voluntary initiatives occur or are participated in; local community outreach programmes and events, political actions and international solidarity & aid campaigns—to shortly try sum up a very long list.

Many simply find a place to exist and have loving friends and family in any kind of normal sense, often in strong contrast to what they may have come through in life. Freely shared social capital emerges solely for the aspects of giving, learning and growing relationships. Art then flourishes and given time dereliction becomes beautiful, productive and central to an existing urban community experiencing the irreversibly destructive effects of gentrification.

Communities of people, as in some way outlined above, are in my hind-sighted opinion the primary means of prosperity, happiness and, therein, freedom.

Everything has a place and while it might not be beneficial to you directly, it will benefit someone or something, somewhere. When we share our resources, talents, and understanding we prosper immensely. When we forgo our fear we make our actions loud because we know that above all we’re true to ourselves.

Peace and love always

Persons unknown of Tara Hill Squat

Riality Art -Art Exhibition Highlighting Addiction & Homelessness this Thursday

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Riality Art is a creative art group based in the Rialto Community Drug Team. Established two months ago we aim to address social issues through the medium of art, creative writing, film, photography and poetry. We invite you to our first exhibition highlighting addiction & homelessness being held this Thursday 27th of October at 3pm in the RCDT located at 468 SCR, Rialto. We hope to see you there. Refreshments will be available.

 

starry-night

Mental Health Week, by Billy O Hanluain

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For some, it is the vehicle that brings pensioners to the bingo, for others it might be the transport from the airport to the hotel or even that taxi that brings a group of six to a house party. I am talking about the “Mini Bus”; two words that still make me very uneasy many years after I was in one, being brought to places I didn’t want to go to.

You have seen them, those white mini buses that are stopped at traffic lights near the bus stop you are waiting at. The side of the bus, emblazoned with the letters HSE, Saint Ita’s, Saint Loman’s, Saint Brendan’s….my Saint was John of God. Lazily you catch a glance of the passengers, some with bucked teeth and rolling eyes, others staring into some private infinity, drooling, there was always a drooler, no mini bus would be complete without one.

And the rockers and the rollers, shaking in their seats and hey! That’s me, covering my face like somebody leaving court as the bus passes my secondary school hoping to god the mini bus wouldn’t be caught in traffic at the school bus stop and the girls in tartan green and the boys in navy blue might see me. The banal cruelty of a school bus stop.Fatso, faggot, knacker and if a mini bus passed by, a good chance for the heroes of the 46A to shout “Look at the Johniers!” and pull faces at them. Truth is, I may well have done that in the past, mocked them but now I was a passenger being brought to the Spring Show to collect brochures about combine harvesters and stickers for pesticide companies, how I wanted for some machine to mow the wild acres of my sadness. Maybe we were going bowling in Stillorgan where one girl was so thin she had to lift the lightest ball and it always fell in the side gulley and nobody ever got a strike. The bowling alley was no shelter from shame. Lads from my school sometimes came there after school to play video games. As I’d pick up the ball, a seal’s face pierced with three holes, the nurse would say “Go on Billy, a strike, aren’t ye great…”.I didn’t want my name spoken out loud. I didn’t want to be there. There was one boy who refused point blank to bowl and instead scratched words on his arms. I have an irrational hatred of bowling to this day. Many years ago I went bowling in Madrid and broke down completely, tore off the pathetic clown shoes you have to wear so as not to damage the surface, and beat my head to migraine with them, needless to say that date didn’t end well.

People who access mental health services aren’t others they are us, they are me. But the stigma stays like an unwanted tattoo. The memory of things I saw and people I met and the sound of doors being locked has never quite been erased. The many months I missed from school. The drugs. Seeing a lovely young man left mute after ECT. Having to do the Leaving Cert a year after all my former class mates. Meeting them, at a house party a month before they’d sit their leaving. I was out only a month, feeling good about myself. Me and another fella were trying to get the attention of a beautiful girl. He chatted her up and then I playfully stepped in….she was enjoying the attention and we all felt so adult in that back garden in Cabninteely, mid-May a month before their final school exams. A free gaff! Eventually she held my hand and my friend said under his breath “ye lucky bugger…” We kissed and I felt an almost unbearably beautiful release from the previous months. We came back into the kitchen where people were dancing. I was holding her hand and that’s when the nightmare started. Another fella, drunk, roared at her, “What are you doing with a Johnier? he’s just out of hospital, could be dangerous, could be psycho…he’s only here because….” Somebody gagged him but I was already smarting with dry tears. I understand now those headlines “Man Killed at house party”. It can happen that easy. An act of love though, that I will keep close to me like a winning hand of poker for the rest of my life, she squeezed my hand and said ” I don’t really know who you are but you’re the nicest guy here” She took me to a bed room and made me feel more alive than I’d felt in years,
Names are important. The Naval Ships of Ireland have the names of mythological Irish women, Aoife, Ethne, Orla, Ciara and even writers Beckett and Joyce. The patients inside the mini buses are given the wing and a prayer of a Saint, sympathy, whereas the sailors are given heroics and literature.

The discourse around mental health has changed a lot since the late 80’s and much of it for the better but much of it still makes me very uneasy. It is a good thing that people are encouraged to “tell their stories”, “to share”, that people can emerge from the shadows of shame and secrecy. I like when I visit secondary schools now that I see posters, painted by students promoting respect and tolerance.

We must ask ourselves though, is it the function of mental health services to help people and rehabilitate them so they can function again in a deeply dysfunctional society? In a society like ours that privatizes everything the bill invariably gets handed on to the individual. Everything becomes a private transaction. Health care, waste collection, education and even spiritual practice are all conducted privately and our sense of belonging to a sane and caring community is eroded in the supposed interests of efficiency, cost and individual rights. The onus is increasingly on the individual to pave his own way, regardless of his or her means.

Yes, it is a good thing that people are able to speak about depression, suicide, addiction and stress but the focus seems to be all the time on the individual being able to deal with these symptoms and get back into the race, if they manage this, the race has invariably become a lot crueler since they were last in it. I accept that some people may have a pre-disposition towards depression or that an addiction may run in a family but nowhere in the current discourse on mental health is anybody really challenging the societal factors that make people sick.

All around us we are surrounded by and compliant with madness and we know it. Whether it is the annihilation of our imaginations by advertising, our fear of being who we really are, the constant attacks launched on people’s self-esteem by marketers, class division, war, lives spent in meaningless jobs, show me a child in a playground who dreams of being a sub-prime lender? There are none. Somewhere along the line we co-opt and voluntarily sign up to servitude. We smother our own dreams before they even have a chance of crawling towards realization. So many of us live lives of bad faith being, untrue to ourselves, we don’t want to take responsibility, the burden is too much. People go to gyms, spend hours on thread mills, running to nowhere. A generation believes that food comes from a supermarket. We have outsourced thought to Google. We have few meaningful rituals or symbols. Our cities are clogged with corporate clutter. Wars are televised between ad breaks. We dance Gangnam style, we “like” cat videos, we eat whatever fad food is going, the burrito, sushi. We invent narratives around Nature, that it is a benign force, a mother, a giver, a carer, while raping her for resources. Look into the eyes of the Atlantic, it cares not a salt spray drop for you. We vote for clone singers on talent shows, while Aleppo is shelled, late night shopping on Thursdays and a new fad diet reviewed on a Saturday radio talk show while a million die out of sight from no food at all. We are overloaded with information; we fear eye contact. Casual violence,,porn, poverty, the suspicion of people who are not exactly like you. And Money, the new moral arbitrator, the new church…. how do you manage it? How much do you spend? How much do you save? How much do you earn? Where do you live? What school did you go to? What school do your children go to? You have three hundred Facebook friends but no one to call when none of the pieces of your rotten puzzle fit together….

And we are surprised that people are sick…

But of course it’s your problem because you can’t cope. There is a whole front line of Pharma-Soldiers there to prescribe medication for you and a lovely label to go with your prescription ADDH for the kids, Bipolar for you and Paranoia for the lady in red at the back of the audience, please read the label carefully and don’t exceed the daily dose, don’t ask too many questions, that’ll be 60 euro, thank you.

Tell your story…. sorry but sometimes one’s story is not strong enough to withstand all that other madness. Maybe it’s us who were in Mini Buses who are not sick at all…. the problem with “telling the story” is that we are all dreadfully unreliable narrators…it’s presumes that there is some epiphany lurking within us all, maybe there is but it is often soon crushed again once we step back into the race. The story doesn’t always heal us; we can become slave to it…it assumes that there is a purpose…. the imposition of purpose on our lives is another source of discontent…. the story is also always changing as the past is not a fixed or objective place, it is forever shifting, being informed and shaped by now, there is no simple returning with a key to unlock it….the trail of crumbs has been blown away by the wind…

I will leave you with these words by Henry Miller

“Every day we slaughter our finest impulses. That is why we get a heartache when we read those lines written by the hand of a master and recognize them as our own, as the tender shoots which we stifled because we lacked the faith to believe in our own powers, our own criterion of truth and beauty. Every man, when he gets quiet, when he becomes desperately honest with himself, is capable of uttering profound truths. We all derive from the same source. there is no mystery about the origin of things. We are all part of creation, all kings, all poets, all musicians; we have only to open up, only to discover what is already there.”

 
Billy O Hanluain is a regular contributor to The Bogmans Cannon

SEX, DRUGS, & HIP-HOP -Video promo for The Pirate show Livestream this Friday

Promo for this Friday’s live-streaming Pirate Show special featuring rebel novelists Frankie Gaffney & Karl Parkinson reading from & discussing their work. Each author will ask the other seven questions, & I’ll be there egging them on towards controversy & madness. This friday 9pm live right here – uncensored alt.culture you won’t get anywhere else. Solidarity likes & shares very much appreciated by us all.

dave lordan

 

Sonic Arts Waterford – A DIY Festival Success, by Mick Shanahan

 

 

mick-shanahanThe purpose of this article is to give a brief outline as to how our small community festival of experimental music and arts came together and has become self sustaining in four years.

Sonic Arts Waterford was formed as an organisation in 2013. During the first two years, the festival was called SAW Fest. From 2015 onwards the festival name has been changed to Sonic Dreams which has a more international sound to it.

The original goal was to create an international festival of experimental music and arts. All the music would be live and mostly electronic. None of those who worked at the birth of the festival had ever run events before. For myself, I’ve been working as a musician in the area of experimental electronic music for over 30 years so had some contacts but little else..

Four years later, and with much heartache at times, I’ve managed to build the festival I always dreamed of and surrounded myself with a great team to take it into the future as I slowly step back.

Here are some of the ways I’ve managed it.

‘Community’ has been at the heart of SAW since the beginning. Nearly all of the artists who perform at our festival each year have applied to perform with us. As our festival grows, the number of artists applying increases. And here’s the thing, we don’t pay fees. We sometimes cover travel costs. The reason artists are willing to forego fees is that we’ve gained a reputation as a festival where artists are truly looked after as family. International artists can arrive a few days before the festival and are housed comfortably with festival volunteers. In reality, they get a free holiday in Ireland in exchange for an hour’s performance. That’s the big difference from what most touring musicians usually encounter. We offer artists and crew the finest in freshly made organic food during the festival. A contented artist is going to perform better and that benefits everyone.

Experience has taught me that surrounding myself with the right people is going to make life so much easier. So who are the right people? As a festival organiser you consider the skills you’ll require and then ideally find people who can meet those needs and also have the same passion as you for a community festival. The initial tendency is to bring passionate friends on board and try and learn together. In most cases this will end in strained friendships. Perhaps consider qualified acquaintances. People who you know slightly but seem to pop up at the same events that you do. The team who now run SAW with me are people I hardly knew 2 years ago. Way less stress and they know what they are doing better than I do. As the ‘public face of SAW’ I can do what I do best and forget about the things I do badly.

‘Selling’ is the part so many find difficult. Once you embark on a festival you still have to spend time flogging it to your local community, media, funding bodies, artists, and just about everyone else you can. You approach it in exactly the same way as if you were selling any product. Features and benefits. Everyone has to see what the benefit for them is in supporting your dream. That may all sound very clinical. It has to be. The time for hippie trippy stuff is when the audience are in the house.

Getting the local community on board.

This is crucial and often comes back to selling. It took a few years for us to get to a point where we are recognised as not just another festival but one that has it’s heart and soul in the concept of people helping each other for fun and not profit. The selling part is all in how you discuss your festival with other people. Let them know about the community aspects to what you are about. That’s what you are flogging.

We made a decision at the start that we would be forever non-profit and have never wavered from that. There are no corporate sponsorships of any description. We do apply for and receive a small grant from our local Art’s Office. This benefits us in that it gives us a financial cushion and also gets our City & County Council involved in promoting our festival. Most of the money raised to run the festival comes through the local community via promotional events and donations. The advantage to this approach is that it engages people throughout the year. It also allows us to sell festival tickets for very little. We still run some free events but found that an entirely free festival resulted in little interest. People sometimes don’t appreciate free stuff.

Our festival is cutting edge and international. That’s where we have placed ourselves and for good reason. Quality has to be at the forefront in all decision making, from the standard of the sound system used right through to the comfort of our audiences. And we achieve this while being very financially conservative.

Anyone undertaking a project like starting a festival needs to know that they are going to pay a considerable personal price. In my case, I lost all my (small) savings, experienced several serious health scares relating to stress in the early days but mostly my ability to earn money due to the festival taking up so much time. Along the way, I lost some friendships that still hurt. I paid the price and now see the benefits to my community.

The future for SAW is looking very good indeed. We are already receiving applications from artists to perform at the 2017 edition which is twelve months away. Personally, my goal is to complete the process of giving the festival away to the current team so I can concentrate again on my own musical career that has been sadly neglected in the interests of SAW. The future’s so bright …..

Mick Shanahan is the founder of Sonic Arts Waterford.

#Repealthe8th London 2016

The sun kindly shone in London for the Repeal the 8th gathering of about 300 people.  The demo was in two parts. One a performance of 77 women wheeling suitcases, to symbolise the 77 women a week who travel abroad from Ireland to access abortion services.  The rest were out in support.

Meeting at Belgrave Square
Meeting at Belgrave Square

There was a small police presence and they liaised with the organisers.  The demo was entirely peaceful.

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77 women with suitcases did a circuit of the square and over to the Irish Embassy
77 women with suitcases did a circuit of the square and over to the Irish Embassy

During this, the entire crowd remained silent, in solidarity with the silence women in Ireland face, when trying to access abortion services or aftercare.

One of the most creative signs. The text inside the number eight is women's stories as published in the media
The text inside the number eight is women’s stories as published in the media
The travelling women stood and faced the Irish Embassy in silence
The travelling women stood and faced the Irish Embassy in silence

The Irish flag is absent outside the Irish Embassy.  There was some speculation as to whether this was due to the Ambassador not being in residence.  Also conspicuously absent were any Pro Life campaigners.

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After facing the embassy, the travelling women turned and faced the rest of the crowd who had come out in support
After facing the embassy, the travelling women turned and faced the rest of the crowd who had come out in support
Great turnout by the men
Great turnout by the men
This lady gave a very moving speech
This lady gave a very moving speech
The Polish are also facing a big fight with women's reproductive rights there moving backwards
The Polish are also facing a big fight with women’s reproductive rights there moving backwards
The demo made the Irish Times too
The demo made the Irish Times too

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#repealthe8th #repealLDN #riseandrepeal #freesafelegal #mybodymychoice #ldn #prochoice #global8 #ARCMarch16 #repealLondon #repealthe8thLDN #londonirish

Barbara O’Donnell

Do you want to Teach Creative Writing? 

TEACHING CREATIVE WRITING – training for teachers and community educators at The Big Smoke Writing Factory


http://bigsmokewritingfactory.com/course/teaching-creative-writing/ to book.

A practical, intensive course in how and why to teach creative writing in a variety of contexts, including schools and community organisations, to adults and children of all ages, to writers in different genres and career stages.
Lesson planning, short-course curriculum design and project planning will be covered in detail, and the course will focus closely on how to get the creative best from each individual student.
Demonstrations of how to integrate the limitless creative possibilities of multimedia devices and applications (e.g Soundcloud, IMOVIE, Voice FX, GarageBand etc) for use in the creative writing classroom – a crucial set of teaching skills in todays rapidly evolving digital creativity environment – also included.
Learn how to find your niche and seek employment in the growing but complex creative writing teaching profession.
Led by Dave Lordan, with leading YA author Claire Hennessy, and Jess Traynor, Literary Manager of The Abbey Theatre, as guest teachers.
Renowned author, performer, and educator Dave Lordan developed his teacher-training practice at Mater Dei Institute of Education, DCU, where he was nominated for the 2013 President’s Award. He is the leading expert in teaching creative writing for community education in Ireland, having partnered on creative writing education projects with RTÉ, DCU, Children’s Books Ireland, Dublin City Libraries, JCSP Libraries, the ICA, Youthreach, among many many others.
Claire Hennessy has published eleven books for young adults and has sixteen years’ experience delivering creative writing sessions in schools and libraries across the country. As well as regularly teaching at the Big Smoke Writing Factory, a creative writing school in Dublin she co-founded in 2009, she has provided workshops for the Irish Writers’ Centre, the Centre for Talented Youth in DCU, Listowel Writers’ Week, the Children’s Book Festival, the Mountains to Sea festival, and many other literary/arts festivals around the country. In 2015-16 she was artist-in-residence at the Church of Ireland College of Education in association with Children’s Books Ireland.
Jessica Traynor is Literary Manager of the Abbey Theatre, and works with emerging and established playwrights to develop plays for the Abbey and Peacock stages. An award-winning poet, she was recently commissioned by Ireland 2016 and the Irish Writers Centre to be part of A Poet’s Rising, broadcast on RTE. She has taught creative writing courses at Big Smoke Writing Factory, the Irish Writers Centre, Fighting Words, and at various Irish literary festivals around Ireland.

http://bigsmokewritingfactory.com/course/teaching-creative-writing/ to book

Fee 250 Euro, Saturday mornings 10.30 to 1.30 on the following dates:
Sat 24 Sept

Sat 8 Oct

Sat 22 Oct

Sat 12 Nov

Sat 26 Nov

Sat 10 Dec

All participants will receive a certificate of completion from The Big Smoke Writing Factory, Ireland’s innovative creative writing school for all ages and backgrounds.

The course is for teachers, community workers, youth workers, practicing writers and similar interested in learning how to integrate creative writing teaching into their general work practices, or how to run an introductory creative writing course for adults or children. Although the only qualification required is a desire to teach creative writing, some teaching/youth/community work experience an advantage. Applicants without teaching or facilitation experience should be mindful that teaching of any kind is a difficult profession requiring advanced organisational and people

Teaching Creative Writing with Dave Lordan, Claire Hennessy, & Jess Traynor

 

 

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A practical, intensive course in how and why to teach creative writing in a variety of contexts, including schools and community organisations, to adults and children of all ages, to writers in different genres and career stages.

Lesson planning, short-course curriculum design and project planning will be covered in detail, and the course will focus closely on how to get the creative best from each individual student.

Demonstrations of how to integrate the limitless creative possibilities of multimedia devices and applications (e.g Soundcloud, IMOVIE, Voice FX, GarageBand etc) for use in the creative writing classroom – a crucial set of teaching skills in todays rapidly evolving digital creativity environment – also included.

Learn how to find your niche and seek employment in the growing but complex creative writing teaching profession.

Led by Dave Lordan, with leading YA author Claire Hennessy, and Jess Traynor, Literary Manager of The Abbey Theatre, as guest teachers.

Renowned author, performer, and educator Dave Lordan developed his teacher-training practice at Mater Dei Institute of Education, DCU, where he was nominated for the 2013 President’s Award. He is the leading expert in teaching creative writing for community education in Ireland, having partnered on creative writing education projects with RTÉ, DCU, Children’s Books Ireland, Dublin City Libraries, JCSP Libraries, the ICA, Youthreach, among many many others.

Claire Hennessy has published eleven books for young adults and has sixteen years’ experience delivering creative writing sessions in schools and libraries across the country. As well as regularly teaching at the Big Smoke Writing Factory, a creative writing school in Dublin she co-founded in 2009, she has provided workshops for the Irish Writers’ Centre, the Centre for Talented Youth in DCU, Listowel Writers’ Week, the Children’s Book Festival, the Mountains to Sea festival, and many other literary/arts festivals around the country. In 2015-16 she was artist-in-residence at the Church of Ireland College of Education in association with Children’s Books Ireland.

Jessica Traynor is Literary Manager of the Abbey Theatre, and works with emerging and established playwrights to develop plays for the Abbey and Peacock stages. An award-winning poet, she was recently commissioned by Ireland 2016 and the Irish Writers Centre to be part of A Poet’s Rising, broadcast on RTE. She has taught creative writing courses at Big Smoke Writing Factory, the Irish Writers Centre, Fighting Words, and at various Irish literary festivals around Ireland.

10.30am -1.30 pm on the following Saturdays this autumn.

Sat 24 Sept

Sat 8 Oct

Sat 22 Oct

Sat 12 Nov

Sat 26 Nov

Sat 10 Dec

Fee 250 euro

Venue: Big Smoke Writing Factory. Fee 250 euros

All participants will receive a certificate of completion from The Big Smoke Writing Factory, Ireland’s innovative creative writing school for all ages and backgrounds.

bigsmokewritingfactory@gmail.com to enquire or book.

UP the rebels! – a sampler of the new irish poetry, to celebrate the people’s anniversary of the rising

Tangled in Tangled FX

Click here for the PDF of

UP THE REBELS

featuring

Liz Quirke Kevin Higgins Susan Millar Dumars Sarah Clancy Elaine Feeney Neil McCarthy Stephen Murray Abby Oliveira Graham Allen William Wall Jessamine O Connor Quincy Lehr Trevor Joyce  Michael J. Whelan Karl Parkinson Joe Horgan Kimberley Campanello Daniel Wade Erin Fornoff Jessica Traynor Owen Gallagher Christy Gaffney Jessamine O Connor Cormac Lally Connie Roberts Adam Wyeth Rachel Coventry

edited by Dave Lordan

published as a free gift by The Bogmans Cannon to celebrate the people’s anniversary of the Easter 1916 Rising.